Big game hunting and selective, social media misanthropy.

An observation I can relay from my wasted time on sites like Twitter Et al. is that there seems to be a glitch in the logic that appears in some folk’s ways of seeing the world.

There’s a number of personalities I follow on that site. They seem to be able to discern the difference between nonsense and value as they comment on the issues the pique their interest.

But there is one aspect of their commentary that I often find having a commonality with the nitwit brigade. That aspect would be their take on the subject of big game hunting.

Now, as someone from the redneck state of F.N.Q. I can say (hand on heart) that I don’t have any overwhelming issues with the idea of hunting the big five for the sake of obtaining a wall hanging. I find the hand-wringing of these types in their opposition to this aspect of life, to be equal parts hypocritical and hysterical at the least. And I’ll articulate my reasoning later in this write up to justify that claim later.

I want to take the conversation off tangent just slightly for a moment. It’ll seem weird initially but I think it’ll suit this exercise’s purpose.

I’ve recently watched an episode of the late Anthony Bourdain’s Parts Unknown. The episode in question focused on his visit to Tokyo. One aspect about the culture he presented, with the assent of the locals he interviewed, was the difference between the activities the Japanese engaged in after hours as opposed to the social norms for their culture’s ordinary hours of operations. The city of Tokyo as Bourdain perceived it, was what could reasonably appear to the Western mind, a cornucopia of all kinds of oddities.

One aspect that really amazed me as an alternate feature to the culture was the anime/manga scene and its focus on erotica of the more perverse nature and Tokyo’s red light districts.

Just watch that episode and get a feel for it yourself. Bourdain was even a little weirded out by it all. And that’s saying something considering the places he’s been and the experiences he’s had.

I haven’t visited Tokyo myself but I have had the fortune of touring Osaka and Kyoto. And one thing I noticed about the Japanese is that their communities and people are orderly and polite in spite of the massive sizes of their cities. I mean, Kyoto after hours seemed like a quiet country town after dark. It was weird how deserted and still things were in the city centre after the daylight/business hours were done for the day.

While watching the Tokyo episode of Parts Unknown, one of the Japanese locals claimed that all the weirdness observed by Bourdain was simply an exercise in venting, a letting go of those pressures accumulated by the somewhat rigid nature of civilised life in Japan. And in doing so those pressures were accommodated and contained while leaving the common life unaffected.

As a side note, I’d have to add that the mortality rate due to suicide and the pressures of working for the Japanese would demonstrate a counterexample but human nature is often too complicated to reduce to even a narrow collection of causative aspects. That’s definitely a conversational topic for another time.

The contrast in the aspects of the Japanese culture I’ve observed both personally and on the Tokyo episode of Parts Unknown struck me as familiar to the commentary I’ve witnessed with my social media acquaintances in relation to their opposition to trophy hunting. It’s like they have a smart/dumb switch available to them when they offer their take on the subject in comparison with their usual deliberations on life.

And what I’m getting at isn’t just a simple opposition to big game hunting. It’s the nature of the anti-hunters commentary on the subject. One thing you’ll be guaranteed to see in the public reaction to pictures or footage of big game hunting is the rabid nature of those reactions.

There seems to be a perception that calling for the murder or maiming of hunters and their families is an intelligent means of demonstrating the eco-friendly, conservationist mindset. It always amazes me how they fail to see the fracture in their logic with this approach.

There’s a contradiction with voicing an opinion in support of the preservation of life and switching almost instantaneously to calling for the elimination of it often simply because of a picture or story they’ve read about online.

The connection I’m seeing between the two topics I’m talking about here does offer some food for thought though. I’d argue that a lot of the mindless umbrage we see from the anti-hunting crowd on social media is a perverse form of an unintended consequence. A desire for acceptance with the broader group of social media consumers outside of their usual ingroups. A way of demonstrating to their usual opponents that they’re not as bad as they’re made out to be.

A signalling of a greater, more universal *ahem*…Virtue™.

This activity appears to my untrained mind, an exercise in allaying in-group/outgroup aspect to the way humans perceive the world. As much as we would like to appear unique we also want to appeal to the collective in order to not totally alienate ourselves from their perception of a greater community. And I think social media effect can easily amplify that appeal to the individual.

The number of times I see these social media personalities, who would usually oppose the erratic nature of the SJW, socially acceptable mindsets on these platforms, utilising an appeal to emotion with commentary comparing hunters to murders or even ISIS reminds me of the caution that’s required when relying on the opinions of my fellow social media acquaintances.

And it’s a pity that this can pass without being challenged, as there can be problems with the conservation of these animals and their habitats, that goes unnoticed when the attention of the masses is simply focused on the big game hunters. I’m thinking of habitat reduction due to farming and the development of cities and towns and poaching in nature reserves to name a few.

In closing, I’d suggest that it shouldn’t remain unmentioned that the careful commodification of wild animals as an economic resource can be beneficial to the continuation of those species. In a general sense, we don’t see the livestock we consume on a daily basis being registered as endangered.

And that’s where the focus should be maintained by those opposed to the possible excesses of hunting. A focus on this aspect would nullify the criminal insanity of those in that crowd, that call for the murder of hunters while allowing an additional focus on hunting activities that unsustainably reduce the populations of wild animals as well as recognising the greater pressures of human influence that affect those animals.

Think of it as a win-win option for the intelligent players in this game, an ingroup I’d think we’d all want to claim membership.

 

W.T.F

I was on Twitter yesterday, while I was supposed to be busy doing more important stuff and came across an advert by WordPress about their support for the SSM Dog and Pony show we have going on at the moment in Australia.

While I was scrolling along, I also noticed another Twitter user mention that WordPress has used their platform to apply the widely known, multicoloured symbol the homosexual community uses, across the top of their users pages.

Well, the lazy blogger in me decided to get back to my part-time writing and what do I see?

TA DAHHH!

Screen Shot 2017-09-02 at 12.13.18Fkn LOL.

I see that my page has been modified, without my consent mind you, to engage in this little promotion.

Initially, I penned a somewhat vitriolic spray aimed at this nonsense but I’ve decided to bin that attempt and give it another go because I ain’t to happy with this kind of thing but I’d like to be more civilised about the presentation of my views, even though it still leaves me generally disliking the whole situation.

Ya know, manners and stuff.

Now, I understand that the platform is owned by a private entity. We’ve seen similar arguments play out before with Twitter and YouTube users complaining about these companies influencing content on their platforms. I understand that it may be the case that it’s perfectly legal for the owners of these platforms to engage in this kind of activity.

That aspect’s not the point I’m under any illusions about.

To put my point into perspective, I’m studying a business diploma at the moment and one thing I’ve had the chance to go over is the business/customer dynamic. It’s here I think, the imposition this platform is making, falls fowl of any respect for their customers. A smart business decision-making process should screen this idea out of the business strategy. Especially a business that exists in assisting with encouraging conversations within the market place of ideas.

I’ve got my views on the SSM debacle here in Australia and I call it a debacle due to what has become of the marriage contract in a lot of Western countries ages ago and also the usual political posturing we always see on whatever topic that happens to be doing the rounds at the time.

It’s because of this I’ve really got no time for the SSM idea. As someone who’s been in a common law relationship for the best part of a decade plus, I understand that the law already has a favourable position towards non-traditionally substantiated relationships. That point seems to fail to gain any traction in the debate around this topic for some weird reason.

Hence, my calling it a Dog and Pony show.

The reality is there’s little more than simplistic posturing going on with what has happened here at WordPress, which for all the parties involved can be counter productive. Some folk don’t like being told what to do or what to think irregardless of the message. As for me, I thoroughly loathe the whole SJW mindset. And to have something like this imposed upon you by a service provider you’re paying, adds insult to the small injury it is.

As annoying as it is for WordPress to do this, I don’t see it as a massive issue. I honestly think it should be something the users of the blog site should be offered the use of not forced to do so by some desk sitter else where. The whole exercise smells of a nanny state mindset, which upon consideration of the total of the exercise is plainly pathetic.

But anyway, life does indeed go on.

A statistic with a name I know. A reflection.

I spent some time last night, looking at photos of my brother on FB, at his photos of the family he and his wife have created.

Looking at his photos, seeing how much has changed over the years between them and the young family they’ve created together.

Last night, or more correctly last morning at 02:00 HRS. 

Text messages, both him and his wife. Its been a bit busy here up north, even more so down that way down south it seems. I dragged myself out of bed Friday morning (just gone) on the advice from my partner, that I’d better call my brother’s wife.

We expect these calls but never plan for what comes with them.

I had messages on my phone saying my younger brother had been injured badly in a work accident.

A load roller change out on a tracked mining machine. Standard procedure, nothing unusual. Just another routine job and done.

Nothing unusual. Except the back channel grumble about management and safety on site.

The bolts on this roller are a little buggered you see but we’ve got the right tools for the job. Just set it up, get it done.

Make sure you sign your JSA and do a Take 5 first, wear your gloves, the usual shit, its all been done before. Everything’s being done by the books.

And then it happens, that illusory factor that exhibits itself at the worst opportunity and it wreaks its havoc upon whomever happens to be in its path.

That night-shift, it was one of my own. My brother. Not some unknown name, another statistic .

A 1000 plus kilograms of steel and some more. A broken leg and damaged hand. The shock, the first aid response, those workers who volunteered their skills in recovering the injured, doing the best they can in that situation.

Many years ago, at the mine we both started our apprenticeships, there was a fatal accident.

My brother tells me that the thought of that incident and how it would affect his family was the first thing that crossed his mind in that instant.

It all happens so fast, just like we’re told in every induction we’ve been through since we started in this game all those years ago. There’s no way you dodge the physics of this kind of thing when you’re in the line of fire.

Looking at his photos on FB last night it something became apparent to me, he ain’t my younger brother anymore. He hasn’t been for a long while now.

He’s a husband, a father.

Together, with his wife, they’ve faced their challenges and it’s changed them. It’s changed him in the way life changes the look on a man’s face. That realisation that things aren’t the way they were spelt out to you initially or how you perceive them when you’re younger, that you’ll be thrown into situations that you won’t have the answers for immediately or even after some time.

I see this in his photos. I can’t explain it right at this point but he seems somewhat unrecognisable in the realisation of his personal realities. He’s no longer the familiar brother, the younger, just another family member you occasionally call up to see how things are. He’s a husband and a father.

I don’t have all those commitments myself and maybe that’s the dissonance I’m feeling now. I have a mortgage but he has people depending on what he does, his ability to provide and protect. This is one of those moments where the realities of life come rolling in and make their presence known.

There’s an aspect to individual life, an aspect that your closest relatives and friends might not see because they’re always interacting with you.

The photos. The familiarity of a common past. The distance created when you move away and start your own lives. Those factors create a disconnection and reliance on the memories of the past or selected instances. I call it the social media effect.

Sudden changes will focus you onto these aspects, even in a photo. It wakes you up to who you’re looking at and the realities we face and the changes that happen to us as we move through life.

I found it revealing. I’ve never experienced this apart from witnessing the passing of my parents many years ago. But that was different, we expected that, they were sick and that’s how life plays out. You see it coming, even subconsciously, you’re waiting like a nail for that hammer.

What happened to my brother is different. We prepare ourselves and our work environments to prevent this kind of thing happening. We have safe systems of work, tier one companies, OHS reps, Unions, JSA’s etc. right?

Ask yourself, look around your workplace. Think about it. How many compromises do we get away with daily?

This time next year he should be walking again after the surgeries and rehabilitation. And so should his youngest son (for his first time). Between here and then there’ll be a lot of changes to his family’s lifestyle.

I have a saying as a tradie, you’re only one accident away from a career change, wheelchair or a bodybag. I’ve seen it a few times and heard of it plenty more. We all have either personally or in the news.

It’s only a few nights ago the Reaper took a swing at my brother and only wounded him.

And I’ll say we’re all so lucky the fucker’s aim was off.

P.S.

I wrote this reflection around the time post incident a couple of months ago and things have straightened out some more now and the details relating to this incident have slowly become a little more apparent. I won’t go into the details but suffice to say, I’ve extensive experience working in the same sector of our economy and I’m more than aware of what’s going on with this situation. Too add to my initial analysis, my brother’s condition and outlook has markedly improved and he’s now a lot more mobile than it initially looked like it would be at the time. And the youngest boy is just starting to get independently mobile as well. It’ll be a year or three before this is all worked out. It’ll be a bunch of life lessons we’ll all reference for years to come.

Something about those numbers.

It never fails to surprise me when I hear of the claim “we need more female CEOs” in the workplace.

I’m always left asking the question: Why not more plumbers, police and ambulance operators?

I’ve recently been working my way through Warren Farrell’s-The Myth of Male Power– in which he details the risks in the workplace of which men routinely take the burden. He describes this societal dynamic as “My body, not my choice”.

It’s an interesting concept.

I remember seeing a graphic on the wall of the medical centre at a recent work site I was on stating that the current workplace fatality rate was above 90% for the males in the industry in Australia.

Every construction site I’ve been on, in the 17 years I’ve been in this industry, has a gender imbalance of males. Why is that the case? Does the feminist academia and political scene have something to say about this aspect?

Dr. Farrell offers the concept of the financial womb that males provide society. And with that the comes the risks of injury and fatality that each sector of the economy inherently contains.

Tonight, I’ve read a blog post by Jim Rose detailing the workplace injury/fatality rates by gender in New Zealand for 2015.

“all but three of the fatal workplace accidents in NZ were men”.

Here’s the link to provide some support to what I’m talking about,

Workplace deaths/injuries in New Zealand for 2015.

As the saying goes, this ain’t my first rodeo. I’ve been on enough of this projects to know better and I’m slowly racking up a number of jobs I’ve walked away from due to safety concerns.

And it’s hard sometimes when you consider the old “harden the fuck up” cliché and the financial aspect of the role you take on as a male worker.

I’ve had female friends (in defence of the feminist stance) describe this as an aspect of the famed patriarchy doing its thing and I believe there’s a part truth there in that claim.

But what stuns me is the lack of realisation, that there’s a whole lot of women in our community that’ll go along quietly with this, as the economic security provided by that patriarchy supports the matriarchy that walks hand in hand with it.

This to me, is one of the more spineless aspects of feminism.

The claim for money and power, inherent in feminism’s edicts, in pursuit of the ideal of equality, is baseless until they recognise the risk/hazard factor that exists in the modern economy regarding the grunt work that makes the wheels of industry turn.

I’ll believe that the average feminist has the courage of their convictions, when I see the gender imbalance on construction sites, weighted in favour of their claimed equality and we all see as a society women embracing employment outside of the usual occupations that females seem to dominate.

Some how I don’t think we’ll be seeing any changes soon.

Winter time=Business time.

Talking to my bro today.

He’s currently two thirds through the offspring’s birthday celebrations at the moment.

They have three of them.

I didn’t realise this but apparently they’re all a week apart with their respective birthdays.

Apparently winter was a good time for “business time” as a famed pair of Kiwis sang/white fella rapped about some time ago.

I suppose living in a location that corresponds with “normal” seasonal transitions helps as well.

Not like the most of northern Australia. Which is either wet or dry.

#straya.